When using infra-red radiation to photograph the landscape one obtains incredible images: skies and static water often record black, or very dark, and chlorophyll – deciduous trees and grass – almost 'glow' white. Infra-red photography uses that part of the electromagnetic spectrum that lies below red but above heat. Normal photography, either film or digital, does not record the infra-red wavelengths. Special film or modified digital cameras are required. Both Robin and Gigi are experts on photography with infra-red radiation – having written many original research papers and book chapters on the subject. Gigi wrote a postgraduate Fellowship thesis on the techniques and their application to medicine and Robin was a pioneer of digital infra-red photography. See the 'Medical Photography' section of this website.