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Lake Tyrrell is one of the so-called pink lakes of Northern Victoria, Australia. Located at the Northern end of Mallee wheat belt, the Lake derives its colour from red algae, which is most apparent as the lake dries out in the Southern Hemisphere spring. During the winter the Lake fills with a modest depth of water which acts as a spectacular mirror on windless days and nights. The word ‘Tyrrell’ is derived from the Boorong Aboriginal word for ‘sky’ and the lake truly reflects the sky by day and night. The lake covers over 50,000 acres making it Victoria’s largest salt lake. As the water levels fall, salt encrustation begins to form on the lake surface and combined with the increasing pink colour creates a truly magical place. It is possible to walk across many kilometres of the lake surface and discover old fence lines or sections of tumbleweed ‘frozen’ in white salt and sitting on the pink lake bed. Salt used to be commercially farmed here and there are ghostly reminders of man’s habitation – slowly being eroded and absorbed back into the land. Unfortunately this isolated and spectacular location is rapidly being ruined by tens of thousands of tourists who come every year to take their ‘selfies’ and leave behind their rubbish, gum boots and sometimes vehicles!